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  1. Aggregation sites represent important sources of environmental heterogeneity and can modify the movement behavior of animals. When these sites are artificially established through anthropogenic actions, the co...

    Authors: Géraldine Pérez, Laurent Dagorn, Jean-Louis Deneubourg, Fabien Forget, John D. Filmalter, Kim Holland, David Itano, Shiham Adam, Riyaz Jauharee, Sunil P. Beeharry and Manuela Capello
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:47
  2. Improved understanding of the foraging ecology of bats in the face of ongoing habitat loss and modification worldwide is essential to their conservation and maintaining the substantial ecosystem services they ...

    Authors: Elodie Schloesing, Rémi Chambon, Annelise Tran, Kinley Choden, Sébastien Ravon, Jonathan H. Epstein, Thavry Hoem, Neil Furey, Morgane Labadie, Mathieu Bourgarel, Hélène M. De Nys, Alexandre Caron and Julien Cappelle
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:46
  3. Habitat loss can force animals to relocate to new areas, where they would need to adjust to an unfamiliar resource landscape and find new breeding sites. Relocation may be costly and could compromise reproduct...

    Authors: Marwa M. Kavelaars, Jan M. Baert, Eric W. M. Stienen, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Luc Lens and Wendt Müller
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:45
  4. Long-distance seed dispersal (LDD) has strong impacts on the spatiotemporal dynamics of plants. Large animals are important LDD vectors because they regularly transport seeds of many plant species over long di...

    Authors: Stephen J. Wright, Marco Heurich, Carsten M. Buchmann, Reinhard Böcker and Frank M. Schurr
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:44
  5. Animal movement expressed through home ranges or space-use can offer insights into spatial and habitat requirements. However, different classes of estimation methods are currently instinctively applied to answ...

    Authors: Inês Silva, Matt Crane, Benjamin Michael Marshall and Colin Thomas Strine
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:43
  6. Age at maturity and the timing of first breeding are important life history traits. Most small shorebird species mature and breed as ‘yearlings’, but have lower reproductive success than adults. In some specie...

    Authors: Eveling A. Tavera, Glenn E. Stauffer, David B. Lank and Ronald C. Ydenberg
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:42
  7. The heterogeneous oceanographic conditions of continental shelf ecosystems result in a three-dimensionally patchy distribution of prey available to upper-trophic level predators. The association of bio-physica...

    Authors: B. V. R. Nowak, W. D. Bowen, K. Whoriskey, D. C. Lidgard, J. E. Mills Flemming and S. J. Iverson
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:41
  8. Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movemen...

    Authors: J. A. J. Eikelboom, H. J. de Knegt, M. Klaver, F. van Langevelde, T. van der Wal and H. H. T. Prins
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:40
  9. Temperatures in arctic-boreal regions are increasing rapidly and pose significant challenges to moose (Alces alces), a heat-sensitive large-bodied mammal. Moose act as ecosystem engineers, by regulating forest ca...

    Authors: Jyoti S. Jennewein, Mark Hebblewhite, Peter Mahoney, Sophie Gilbert, Arjan J. H. Meddens, Natalie T. Boelman, Kyle Joly, Kimberly Jones, Kalin A. Kellie, Scott Brainerd, Lee A. Vierling and Jan U. H. Eitel
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:39
  10. Preserving corridors for movement and gene flow among populations can assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered species. As human activity continues to fragment habitats, characterizing natural corri...

    Authors: Steven J. Hromada, Todd C. Esque, Amy G. Vandergast, Kirsten E. Dutcher, Corey I. Mitchell, Miranda E. Gray, Tony Chang, Brett G. Dickson and Kenneth E. Nussear
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:38
  11. Current animal tracking studies are most often based on the application of external geolocators such as GPS and radio transmitters. While these technologies provide detailed movement data, they are costly to a...

    Authors: Zabibu Kabalika, Thomas A. Morrison, Rona A. R. McGill, Linus K. Munishi, Divine Ekwem, Wilson Leonidas Mahene, Alex L. Lobora, Jason Newton, Juan M. Morales, Daniel T. Haydon and Grant G. J. C. Hopcraft
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:37
  12. Kelp Gulls Larus dominicanus are one of the most abundant gulls in the Southern Hemisphere and can play an important role in their ecosystem. Understanding their foraging ecology is therefore important, especiall...

    Authors: Katharina Reusch, Nicolás Suárez, Peter G. Ryan and Lorien Pichegru
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:36
  13. Under current scenarios of climate change and habitat loss, many wild animals, especially large predators, are moving into novel energetically challenging environments. Consequently, changes in terrain associa...

    Authors: Carolyn E. Dunford, Nikki J. Marks, Christopher C. Wilmers, Caleb M. Bryce, Barry Nickel, Lisa L. Wolfe, D. Michael Scantlebury and Terrie M. Williams
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:34
  14. Studying animal movement provides insights into how animals react to land-use changes. As agriculture expands, we can use animal movement to examine how animals change their behaviour in response. Recent revie...

    Authors: Benjamin Michael Marshall, Matt Crane, Inês Silva, Colin Thomas Strine, Max Dolton Jones, Cameron Wesley Hodges, Pongthep Suwanwaree, Taksin Artchawakom, Surachit Waengsothorn and Matt Goode
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:33
  15. Extreme weather events, including hurricanes, have considerable biological, ecological, and anthropogenic impacts. Hurricane Irene caused substantial economic damage when it hit the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) of...

    Authors: Leah M. Crowe, Joshua M. Hatch, Samir H. Patel, Ronald J. Smolowitz and Heather L. Haas
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:32
  16. State-space models are important tools for quality control and analysis of error-prone animal movement data. The near real-time (within 24 h) capability of the Argos satellite system can aid dynamic ocean mana...

    Authors: Ian D. Jonsen, Toby A. Patterson, Daniel P. Costa, Philip D. Doherty, Brendan J. Godley, W. James Grecian, Christophe Guinet, Xavier Hoenner, Sarah S. Kienle, Patrick W. Robinson, Stephen C. Votier, Scott Whiting, Matthew J. Witt, Mark A. Hindell, Robert G. Harcourt and Clive R. McMahon
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:31
  17. Acoustic telemetry technologies are being increasingly deployed to study a variety of aquatic taxa including fishes, reptiles, and marine mammals. Large cooperative telemetry networks produce vast quantities o...

    Authors: Nathan J. Hostetter and J. Andrew Royle
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:15
  18. Precise and accurate retrospective geolocation of marine predators via their tissues’ isotopic composition relies on quality reference maps of relevant isotopic gradients (“isoscapes”). Additionally, a good wo...

    Authors: Tegan Carpenter-Kling, Pierre Pistorius, Ryan Reisinger, Yves Cherel and Maëlle Connan
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:29
  19. Consistent inter-individual differences in behavioural phenotypes may entail differences in energy efficiency and expenditure, with different fitness payoffs. In colonial-breeding species, inter-individual dif...

    Authors: Jacopo G. Cecere, Federico De Pascalis, Simona Imperio, Delphine Ménard, Carlo Catoni, Matteo Griggio and Diego Rubolini
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:28
  20. Acquiring high resolution quantitative behavioural data underwater often involves installation of costly infrastructure, or capture and manipulation of animals. Aquatic movement ecology can therefore be limite...

    Authors: Fritz A Francisco, Paul Nührenberg and Alex Jordan
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:27
  21. Recent studies have proposed that birds migrating short distances migrate at an overall slower pace, minimizing energy expenditure, while birds migrating long distances minimize time spent on migration to cope...

    Authors: Christine M. Anderson, H. Grant Gilchrist, Robert A. Ronconi, Katherine R. Shlepr, Daniel E. Clark, David A. Fifield, Gregory J. Robertson and Mark L. Mallory
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:26
  22. In highly seasonal environments, animals face critical decisions regarding time allocation, diet optimisation, and habitat use. In the Arctic, the short summers are crucial for replenishing body reserves, whil...

    Authors: Larissa T. Beumer, Jennifer Pohle, Niels M. Schmidt, Marianna Chimienti, Jean-Pierre Desforges, Lars H. Hansen, Roland Langrock, Stine Højlund Pedersen, Mikkel Stelvig and Floris M. van Beest
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:25
  23. Recursive movement patterns have been used to detect behavioral structure within individual movement trajectories in the context of foraging ecology, home-ranging behavior, and predator avoidance. Some animals...

    Authors: Simona Picardi, Brian J. Smith, Matthew E. Boone, Peter C. Frederick, Jacopo G. Cecere, Diego Rubolini, Lorenzo Serra, Simone Pirrello, Rena R. Borkhataria and Mathieu Basille
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:24
  24. The timing of events in the early part of the breeding season is crucially important for successful reproduction. Long-lived animals that migrate large distances independently of each other meet at the breedin...

    Authors: Petra Quillfeldt, Henri Weimerskirch, Karine Delord and Yves Cherel
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:23
  25. Geographic regions, where two closely related taxa with different migration routes come into contact, are known as migratory divides. Hybrids originating from migratory divides are hypothesized to migrate inte...

    Authors: Tianhao Zhao, Mihaela Ilieva, Keith Larson, Max Lundberg, Júlio M. Neto, Kristaps Sokolovskis, Susanne Åkesson and Staffan Bensch
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:22
  26. An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

    Authors: Ninon F. V. Meyer, Ricardo Moreno, Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Johannes Signer and Niko Balkenhol
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:20

    The original article was published in Movement Ecology 2020 8:3

  27. Where mesopredators co-exist with dominant apex predators, an understanding of the factors that influence their habitat and space use can provide insights that help guide wildlife conservation and pest managem...

    Authors: Michael L. Wysong, Bronwyn A. Hradsky, Gwenllian D. Iacona, Leonie E. Valentine, Keith Morris and Euan G. Ritchie
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:18
  28. Human activities have profoundly altered the spatio-temporal availability of food resources. Yet, there is a clear lack of knowledge on how opportunistic species adapt to these new circumstances by scheduling ...

    Authors: Yaiza Parra-Torres, Francisco Ramírez, Isabel Afán, Jacopo Aguzzi, Willem Bouten, Manuela G. Forero and Joan Navarro
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:17
  29. Many felid species are of high conservation concern, and with increasing human disturbance the situation is worsening. Small isolated populations are at risk of genetic impoverishment decreasing within-species...

    Authors: Joseph Premier, Jörns Fickel, Marco Heurich and Stephanie Kramer-Schadt
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:16
  30. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) is a pathogen vectored by Culicoides midges that causes significant economic loss in the cervid farming industry and affects wild deer as well. Despite this, its ecology...

    Authors: Emily T. N. Dinh, Allison Cauvin, Jeremy P. Orange, Rebecca M. Shuman, Samantha M. Wisely and Jason K. Blackburn
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:14
  31. The feeding preferences of Diabrotica speciosa (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) cause a parent-offspring conflict, as providing the best host for the offspring development is detrimental to adult survival and fecundit...

    Authors: Adriano G. Garcia, Wesley A. C. Godoy, Fernando L. Cônsoli and Claudia P. Ferreira
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:13
  32. Despite our understanding of the principal factors that shape bird migration strategies, there is conflicting evidence regarding the role of habitat in shaping migration routes and schedules, including day and...

    Authors: Thomas G. Hadjikyriakou, Emmanuel C. Nwankwo, Munir Z. Virani and Alexander N. G. Kirschel
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:10
  33. Tackling behavioural questions often requires identifying points in space and time where animals make decisions and linking these to environmental variables. State-space modeling is useful for analysing moveme...

    Authors: Mohammad S. Farhadinia, Théo Michelot, Paul J. Johnson, Luke T. B. Hunter and David W. Macdonald
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:9
  34. California horn sharks (Heterodontus francisci) are nocturnally active, non-obligate ram ventilating sharks in rocky reef habitats that play an important ecological role in regulating invertebrate communities. We...

    Authors: Emily N. Meese and Christopher G. Lowe
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:8
  35. Songbirds following distinct migration strategies (e.g. long- vs. short- to medium-distance migrants) often differ in their speed of migration during autumn and, thus, are assumed to face different time constr...

    Authors: Florian Packmor, Thomas Klinner, Bradley K. Woodworth, Cas Eikenaar and Heiko Schmaljohann
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:6
  36. Movement, from foraging to migration, is known to be under the influence of the environment. The translation of environmental cues to individual movement decision making is determined by an individual’s intern...

    Authors: Steven Goossens, Nicky Wybouw, Thomas Van Leeuwen and Dries Bonte
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:5
  37. Habitat fragmentation is a primary driver of wildlife loss, and the establishment of biological corridors is a conservation strategy to mitigate this problem. Identifying areas with high potential functional c...

    Authors: Ninon F. V. Meyer, Ricardo Moreno, Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Johannes Signer and Niko Balkenhol
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:3

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2020 8:20

  38. Dispersal and reproduction are key life-history traits that jointly determine species’ potential to expand their distribution, for instance in light of ongoing climate change. These life-history traits are kno...

    Authors: Marina Wolz, Michael Klockmann, Torben Schmitz, Stano Pekár, Dries Bonte and Gabriele Uhl
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:2
  39. A strong behavioural plasticity is commonly evidenced in the movements of marine megafauna species, and it might be related to an adaptation to local conditions of the habitat. One way to investigate such beha...

    Authors: Philippine Chambault, Mayeul Dalleau, Jean-Benoît Nicet, Pascal Mouquet, Katia Ballorain, Claire Jean, Stéphane Ciccione and Jérôme Bourjea
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:1
  40. Animals can obtain a higher foraging yield by optimizing energy expenditure or minimizing time costs. In this study, we assessed how individual variation in the relative use of marine and terrestrial foraging ...

    Authors: Alejandro Sotillo, Jan M. Baert, Wendt Müller, Eric W. M. Stienen, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares and Luc Lens
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2019 7:41
  41. Although navigating along a network of routes might constrain animal movement flexibility, it may be an energetically efficient strategy. Routinely using the same route allows for visually monitoring of food r...

    Authors: Miguel de Guinea, Alejandro Estrada, K. Anne-Isola Nekaris and Sarie Van Belle
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2019 7:39