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  1. Studies of animal movement using location data are often faced with two challenges. First, time series of animal locations are likely to arise from multiple behavioral states (e.g., directed movement, resting)...

    Authors: Dalton J. Hance, Katie M. Moriarty, Bruce A. Hollen and Russell W. Perry

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:17

    Content type: Research

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  2. Our understanding of movement patterns and behaviours of wildlife has advanced greatly through the use of improved tracking technologies, including application of accelerometry (ACC) across a wide range of tax...

    Authors: Hui Yu, Jian Deng, Ran Nathan, Max Kröschel, Sasha Pekarsky, Guozheng Li and Marcel Klaassen

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:15

    Content type: Methodology article

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  3. The movement and spatial ecology of an animal depends on its morphological and functional adaptations to its environment. In fossorial animals, adaptations to the underground life help to face peculiar ecologi...

    Authors: José Martín, Jesús Ortega, Roberto García-Roa, Octavio Jiménez-Robles, Gonzalo Rodríguez-Ruiz, Pablo Recio and José Javier Cuervo

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:14

    Content type: Research

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  4. From the laboratory at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, it is common to see the brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) traveling along the crests of ocean waves just offshore of the surf-zone. When flying in ...

    Authors: Ian A. Stokes and Andrew J. Lucas

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:13

    Content type: Research

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  5. Movements and habitat selection of predators shape ecological communities by determining the spatiotemporal distribution of predation risk. Although intraspecific interactions associated to territoriality and ...

    Authors: Alexis Grenier-Potvin, Jeanne Clermont, Gilles Gauthier and Dominique Berteaux

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:12

    Content type: Research

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  6. Globally, arid regions are expanding and becoming hotter and drier with climate change. For medium and large bodied endotherms in the arid zone, the necessity to dissipate heat drives a range of adaptations, f...

    Authors: Jack Tatler, Shannon E. Currie, Phillip Cassey, Anne K. Scharf, David A. Roshier and Thomas A. A. Prowse

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:11

    Content type: Research

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  7. For many songbirds in North America, we lack movement details about the full annual cycle, notably outside the breeding season. Understanding how populations are linked spatially between breeding and overwinte...

    Authors: Kristen A. Mancuso, Megan A. Fylling, Christine A. Bishop, Karen E. Hodges, Michael B. Lancaster and Katharine R. Stone

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:10

    Content type: Research

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  8. Departure decisions in long-distance migratory bird species may depend on favourable weather conditions and beneficial resources at the destination location, overarched by genetic triggers. However, few studie...

    Authors: Philipp Schwemmer, Moritz Mercker, Klaus Heinrich Vanselow, Pierrick Bocher and Stefan Garthe

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:9

    Content type: Research

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  9. Over the past two decades, various species of forage fish have been successfully implanted with miniaturized acoustic transmitters and subsequently monitored using stationary acoustic receivers. When acoustic ...

    Authors: Mary A. Bishop and Jordan W. Bernard

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:8

    Content type: Methodology article

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  10. Inertial measurement units (IMUs) with high-resolution sensors such as accelerometers are now used extensively to study fine-scale behavior in a wide range of marine and terrestrial animals. Robust and practic...

    Authors: Melinda G. Conners, Théo Michelot, Eleanor I. Heywood, Rachael A. Orben, Richard A. Phillips, Alexei L. Vyssotski, Scott A. Shaffer and Lesley H. Thorne

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:7

    Content type: Research

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  11. Habitat suitability models give insight into the ecological drivers of species distributions and are increasingly common in management and conservation planning. Telemetry data can be used in habitat models to...

    Authors: Elliott L. Hazen, Briana Abrahms, Stephanie Brodie, Gemma Carroll, Heather Welch and Steven J. Bograd

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:5

    Content type: Research

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  12. Plant dispersal is a critical factor driving ecological responses to global changes. Knowledge on the mechanisms of dispersal is rapidly advancing, but selective pressures responsible for the evolution of disp...

    Authors: Jelle Treep, Monique de Jager, Frederic Bartumeus and Merel B. Soons

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:4

    Content type: Research

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  13. Artificial light at night is recognized as an increasing threat to biodiversity. However, information on the way highly mobile taxa such as bats spatially respond to light is limited. Following the hypothesis ...

    Authors: Kévin Barré, Christian Kerbiriou, Ros-Kiri Ing, Yves Bas, Clémentine Azam, Isabelle Le Viol and Kamiel Spoelstra

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:3

    Content type: Research

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  14. Animal movement patterns are the result of both environmental and physiological effects, and the rates of movement and energy expenditure of given movement strategies are influenced by the physical environment...

    Authors: Jay A. VonBank, Mitch D. Weegman, Paul T. Link, Stephanie A. Cunningham, Kevin J. Kraai, Daniel P. Collins and Bart M. Ballard

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:2

    Content type: Research

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  15. Satellite tags have revolutionized our understanding of marine animal movements. However, tags may stop transmitting for many reasons and little research has rigorously examined tag failure. Using a long-term,...

    Authors: Kristen M. Hart, Jacquelyn C. Guzy and Brian J. Smith

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:1

    Content type: Research

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  16. Metapopulation persistence in fragmented landscapes is assured by dispersal of individuals between local populations. In this scenario the landscape topography, although usually neglected, may have an importan...

    Authors: Elisa Plazio, Terezie Bubová, Vladimír Vrabec and Piotr Nowicki

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:50

    Content type: Research

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  17. Mobile animals transport nutrients and propagules across habitats, and are crucial for the functioning of food webs and for ecosystem services. Human activities such as urbanization can alter animal movement b...

    Authors: Claire S. Teitelbaum, Jeffrey Hepinstall-Cymerman, Anjelika Kidd-Weaver, Sonia M. Hernandez, Sonia Altizer and Richard J. Hall

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:49

    Content type: Research

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  18. Migratory connectivity describes the degree of linkage between different parts of an animal’s migratory range due to the movement trajectories of individuals. High connectivity occurs when individuals from one...

    Authors: Boya Gao, Johanna Hedlund, Don R. Reynolds, Baoping Zhai, Gao Hu and Jason W. Chapman

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:48

    Content type: Review

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  19. Aggregation sites represent important sources of environmental heterogeneity and can modify the movement behavior of animals. When these sites are artificially established through anthropogenic actions, the co...

    Authors: Géraldine Pérez, Laurent Dagorn, Jean-Louis Deneubourg, Fabien Forget, John D. Filmalter, Kim Holland, David Itano, Shiham Adam, Riyaz Jauharee, Sunil P. Beeharry and Manuela Capello

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:47

    Content type: Research

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  20. Improved understanding of the foraging ecology of bats in the face of ongoing habitat loss and modification worldwide is essential to their conservation and maintaining the substantial ecosystem services they ...

    Authors: Elodie Schloesing, Rémi Chambon, Annelise Tran, Kinley Choden, Sébastien Ravon, Jonathan H. Epstein, Thavry Hoem, Neil Furey, Morgane Labadie, Mathieu Bourgarel, Hélène M. De Nys, Alexandre Caron and Julien Cappelle

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:46

    Content type: Research

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  21. Habitat loss can force animals to relocate to new areas, where they would need to adjust to an unfamiliar resource landscape and find new breeding sites. Relocation may be costly and could compromise reproduct...

    Authors: Marwa M. Kavelaars, Jan M. Baert, Eric W. M. Stienen, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Luc Lens and Wendt Müller

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:45

    Content type: Research

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  22. Long-distance seed dispersal (LDD) has strong impacts on the spatiotemporal dynamics of plants. Large animals are important LDD vectors because they regularly transport seeds of many plant species over long di...

    Authors: Stephen J. Wright, Marco Heurich, Carsten M. Buchmann, Reinhard Böcker and Frank M. Schurr

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:44

    Content type: Research

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  23. Animal movement expressed through home ranges or space-use can offer insights into spatial and habitat requirements. However, different classes of estimation methods are currently instinctively applied to answ...

    Authors: Inês Silva, Matt Crane, Benjamin Michael Marshall and Colin Thomas Strine

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:43

    Content type: Research

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  24. Age at maturity and the timing of first breeding are important life history traits. Most small shorebird species mature and breed as ‘yearlings’, but have lower reproductive success than adults. In some specie...

    Authors: Eveling A. Tavera, Glenn E. Stauffer, David B. Lank and Ronald C. Ydenberg

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:42

    Content type: Research

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  25. The heterogeneous oceanographic conditions of continental shelf ecosystems result in a three-dimensionally patchy distribution of prey available to upper-trophic level predators. The association of bio-physica...

    Authors: B. V. R. Nowak, W. D. Bowen, K. Whoriskey, D. C. Lidgard, J. E. Mills Flemming and S. J. Iverson

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:41

    Content type: Research

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  26. Animals respond to environmental variation by changing their movement in a multifaceted way. Recent advancements in biologging increasingly allow for detailed measurements of the multifaceted nature of movemen...

    Authors: J. A. J. Eikelboom, H. J. de Knegt, M. Klaver, F. van Langevelde, T. van der Wal and H. H. T. Prins

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:40

    Content type: Methodology article

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  27. Temperatures in arctic-boreal regions are increasing rapidly and pose significant challenges to moose (Alces alces), a heat-sensitive large-bodied mammal. Moose act as ecosystem engineers, by regulating forest ca...

    Authors: Jyoti S. Jennewein, Mark Hebblewhite, Peter Mahoney, Sophie Gilbert, Arjan J. H. Meddens, Natalie T. Boelman, Kyle Joly, Kimberly Jones, Kalin A. Kellie, Scott Brainerd, Lee A. Vierling and Jan U. H. Eitel

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:39

    Content type: Research

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  28. Preserving corridors for movement and gene flow among populations can assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered species. As human activity continues to fragment habitats, characterizing natural corri...

    Authors: Steven J. Hromada, Todd C. Esque, Amy G. Vandergast, Kirsten E. Dutcher, Corey I. Mitchell, Miranda E. Gray, Tony Chang, Brett G. Dickson and Kenneth E. Nussear

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:38

    Content type: Research

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  29. Current animal tracking studies are most often based on the application of external geolocators such as GPS and radio transmitters. While these technologies provide detailed movement data, they are costly to a...

    Authors: Zabibu Kabalika, Thomas A. Morrison, Rona A. R. McGill, Linus K. Munishi, Divine Ekwem, Wilson Leonidas Mahene, Alex L. Lobora, Jason Newton, Juan M. Morales, Daniel T. Haydon and Grant G. J. C. Hopcraft

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:37

    Content type: Research

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  30. Kelp Gulls Larus dominicanus are one of the most abundant gulls in the Southern Hemisphere and can play an important role in their ecosystem. Understanding their foraging ecology is therefore important, especiall...

    Authors: Katharina Reusch, Nicolás Suárez, Peter G. Ryan and Lorien Pichegru

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:36

    Content type: Research

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  31. Under current scenarios of climate change and habitat loss, many wild animals, especially large predators, are moving into novel energetically challenging environments. Consequently, changes in terrain associa...

    Authors: Carolyn E. Dunford, Nikki J. Marks, Christopher C. Wilmers, Caleb M. Bryce, Barry Nickel, Lisa L. Wolfe, D. Michael Scantlebury and Terrie M. Williams

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:34

    Content type: Research

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  32. Studying animal movement provides insights into how animals react to land-use changes. As agriculture expands, we can use animal movement to examine how animals change their behaviour in response. Recent revie...

    Authors: Benjamin Michael Marshall, Matt Crane, Inês Silva, Colin Thomas Strine, Max Dolton Jones, Cameron Wesley Hodges, Pongthep Suwanwaree, Taksin Artchawakom, Surachit Waengsothorn and Matt Goode

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:33

    Content type: Research

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  33. Extreme weather events, including hurricanes, have considerable biological, ecological, and anthropogenic impacts. Hurricane Irene caused substantial economic damage when it hit the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) of...

    Authors: Leah M. Crowe, Joshua M. Hatch, Samir H. Patel, Ronald J. Smolowitz and Heather L. Haas

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:32

    Content type: Research

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  34. State-space models are important tools for quality control and analysis of error-prone animal movement data. The near real-time (within 24 h) capability of the Argos satellite system can aid dynamic ocean mana...

    Authors: Ian D. Jonsen, Toby A. Patterson, Daniel P. Costa, Philip D. Doherty, Brendan J. Godley, W. James Grecian, Christophe Guinet, Xavier Hoenner, Sarah S. Kienle, Patrick W. Robinson, Stephen C. Votier, Scott Whiting, Matthew J. Witt, Mark A. Hindell, Robert G. Harcourt and Clive R. McMahon

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:31

    Content type: Methodology article

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  35. Acoustic telemetry technologies are being increasingly deployed to study a variety of aquatic taxa including fishes, reptiles, and marine mammals. Large cooperative telemetry networks produce vast quantities o...

    Authors: Nathan J. Hostetter and J. Andrew Royle

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:15

    Content type: Methodology Article

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  36. Precise and accurate retrospective geolocation of marine predators via their tissues’ isotopic composition relies on quality reference maps of relevant isotopic gradients (“isoscapes”). Additionally, a good wo...

    Authors: Tegan Carpenter-Kling, Pierre Pistorius, Ryan Reisinger, Yves Cherel and Maëlle Connan

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:29

    Content type: Research

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  37. Consistent inter-individual differences in behavioural phenotypes may entail differences in energy efficiency and expenditure, with different fitness payoffs. In colonial-breeding species, inter-individual dif...

    Authors: Jacopo G. Cecere, Federico De Pascalis, Simona Imperio, Delphine Ménard, Carlo Catoni, Matteo Griggio and Diego Rubolini

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:28

    Content type: Research

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  38. Acquiring high resolution quantitative behavioural data underwater often involves installation of costly infrastructure, or capture and manipulation of animals. Aquatic movement ecology can therefore be limite...

    Authors: Fritz A Francisco, Paul Nührenberg and Alex Jordan

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:27

    Content type: Methodology Article

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  39. Recent studies have proposed that birds migrating short distances migrate at an overall slower pace, minimizing energy expenditure, while birds migrating long distances minimize time spent on migration to cope...

    Authors: Christine M. Anderson, H. Grant Gilchrist, Robert A. Ronconi, Katherine R. Shlepr, Daniel E. Clark, David A. Fifield, Gregory J. Robertson and Mark L. Mallory

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:26

    Content type: Research

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  40. In highly seasonal environments, animals face critical decisions regarding time allocation, diet optimisation, and habitat use. In the Arctic, the short summers are crucial for replenishing body reserves, whil...

    Authors: Larissa T. Beumer, Jennifer Pohle, Niels M. Schmidt, Marianna Chimienti, Jean-Pierre Desforges, Lars H. Hansen, Roland Langrock, Stine Højlund Pedersen, Mikkel Stelvig and Floris M. van Beest

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:25

    Content type: Research

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  41. Recursive movement patterns have been used to detect behavioral structure within individual movement trajectories in the context of foraging ecology, home-ranging behavior, and predator avoidance. Some animals...

    Authors: Simona Picardi, Brian J. Smith, Matthew E. Boone, Peter C. Frederick, Jacopo G. Cecere, Diego Rubolini, Lorenzo Serra, Simone Pirrello, Rena R. Borkhataria and Mathieu Basille

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:24

    Content type: Methodology article

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  42. The timing of events in the early part of the breeding season is crucially important for successful reproduction. Long-lived animals that migrate large distances independently of each other meet at the breedin...

    Authors: Petra Quillfeldt, Henri Weimerskirch, Karine Delord and Yves Cherel

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:23

    Content type: Research

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  43. Geographic regions, where two closely related taxa with different migration routes come into contact, are known as migratory divides. Hybrids originating from migratory divides are hypothesized to migrate inte...

    Authors: Tianhao Zhao, Mihaela Ilieva, Keith Larson, Max Lundberg, Júlio M. Neto, Kristaps Sokolovskis, Susanne Åkesson and Staffan Bensch

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:22

    Content type: Research

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  44. An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

    Authors: Ninon F. V. Meyer, Ricardo Moreno, Rafael Reyna-Hurtado, Johannes Signer and Niko Balkenhol

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:20

    Content type: Correction

    Published on:

    The original article was published in Movement Ecology 2020 8:3

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