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  1. Larval connectivity between distinct benthic populations is essential for their persistence. Although connectivity is difficult to measure in situ, it can be predicted via models that simulate biophysical inte...

    Authors: Jonathan Demmer, Peter Robins, Shelagh Malham, Matthew Lewis, Aaron Owen, Trevor Jones and Simon Neill

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2022 10:3

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  2. Invasive reptiles pose a serious threat to global biodiversity, but early detection of individuals in an incipient population is often hindered by their cryptic nature, sporadic movements, and variation among ...

    Authors: Abigail B. Feuka, Melia G. Nafus, Amy A. Yackel Adams, Larissa L. Bailey and Mevin B. Hooten

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2022 10:2

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  3. The timing of autumn migration in ducks is influenced by a range of environmental conditions that may elicit individual experiences and responses from individual birds, yet most studies have investigated relat...

    Authors: Florian G. Weller, William S. Beatty, Elisabeth B. Webb, Dylan C. Kesler, David G. Krementz, Kwasi Asante and Luke W. Naylor

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2022 10:1

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  4. Many birds species range over vast geographic regions and migrate seasonally between their breeding and overwintering sites. Deciding when to depart for migration is one of the most consequential life-history ...

    Authors: Nils Linek, Paweł Brzęk, Phillip Gienapp, M. Teague O’Mara, Ivan Pokrovsky, Andreas Schmidt, J. Ryan Shipley, Jan R. E. Taylor, Juha Tiainen, Tamara Volkmer, Martin Wikelski and Jesko Partecke

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:63

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  5. Habitat specialists living in human-dominated landscapes are likely to be affected by habitat fragmentation and human disturbances more than generalists. But there is a paucity of information on their response...

    Authors: Damber Bista, Greg S. Baxter, Nicholas J. Hudson, Sonam Tashi Lama, Janno Weerman and Peter John Murray

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:62

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  6. The timing of migration for herbivorous migratory birds is thought to coincide with spring phenology as emerging vegetation supplies them with the resources to fuel migration, and, in species with a capital br...

    Authors: Mariëlle L. van Toor, Sergey Kharitonov, Saulius Švažas, Mindaugas Dagys, Erik Kleyheeg, Gerard Müskens, Ulf Ottosson, Ramunas Žydelis and Jonas Waldenström

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:61

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  7. Dispersal is a critical life history strategy that has important conservation implications, particularly for at-risk species with active recovery efforts and migratory species. Both natal and breeding dispersa...

    Authors: Rose J. Swift, Michael J. Anteau, Kristen S. Ellis, Megan M. Ring, Mark H. Sherfy and Dustin L. Toy

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:59

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  8. Biologging now allows detailed recording of animal movement, thus informing behavioural ecology in ways unthinkable just a few years ago. In particular, combining GPS and accelerometry allows spatially explici...

    Authors: Jeanne Clermont, Sasha Woodward-Gagné and Dominique Berteaux

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:58

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  9. Human disturbance alters animal movement globally and infrastructure, such as roads, can act as physical barriers that impact behaviour across multiple spatial scales. In ungulates, roads can particularly hamp...

    Authors: Gioele Passoni, Tim Coulson, Nathan Ranc, Andrea Corradini, A. J. Mark Hewison, Simone Ciuti, Benedikt Gehr, Marco Heurich, Falko Brieger, Robin Sandfort, Atle Mysterud, Niko Balkenhol and Francesca Cagnacci

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:57

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  10. Landfills are a major subsidy for some animals, with implications for their life history and demography. Gulls feed extensively on food from landfills and closures are expected to have ecological consequences,...

    Authors: Liam P. Langley, Stuart Bearhop, Niall H.K. Burton, Alex N. Banks, Tim Frayling, Chris B. Thaxter, Gary D. Clewley, Emily Scragg and Stephen C. Votier

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:56

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  11. This paper introduces DynamoVis version 1.0, an open-source software developed to design, record and export custom animations and multivariate visualizations from movement data, enabling visual exploration and...

    Authors: Somayeh Dodge, Mert Toka and Crystal J. Bae

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:55

    Content type: Software article

    Published on:

  12. Migrations in temperate systems typically have two migratory phases, spring and autumn, and many migratory ungulates track the pulse of spring vegetation growth during a synchronized spring migration. In contr...

    Authors: Matthew D. Cameron, Joseph M. Eisaguirre, Greg A. Breed, Kyle Joly and Knut Kielland

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:54

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  13. Crossing open water instead of following the coast(line) is one way for landbirds to continue migration. However, depending on prevailing weather and the birds’ physiological conditions, it is also a risky cho...

    Authors: Natalie A. Kelsey, Ommo Hüppop and Franz Bairlein

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:53

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  14. Authors: Robert J. Lennox, Samuel Westrelin, Allan T. Souza, Marek Šmejkal, Milan Říha, Marie Prchalová, Ran Nathan, Barbara Koeck, Shaun Killen, Ivan Jarić, Karl Gjelland, Jack Hollins, Gustav Hellstrom, Henry Hansen, Steven J. Cooke, David Boukal…

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:52

    Content type: Correction

    Published on:

    The original article was published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:40

  15. Authors: Batbayar Galtbalt, Amanda Lilleyman, Jonathan T. Coleman, Chuyu Cheng, Zhijun Ma, Danny I. Rogers, Bradley K. Woodworth, Richard A. Fuller, Stephen T. Garnett and Marcel Klaassen

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:51

    Content type: Correction

    Published on:

    The original article was published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:32

  16. Classic ecological formulations of predator–prey interactions often assume that predators and prey interact randomly in an information-limited environment. In the field, however, most prey can accurately asses...

    Authors: Jordi F. Pagès, Frederic Bartumeus, Javier Romero and Teresa Alcoverro

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:50

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  17. Caribou and reindeer across the Arctic spend more than two thirds of their lives moving in snow. Yet snow-specific mechanisms driving their winter ecology and potentially influencing herd health and movement p...

    Authors: Stine Højlund Pedersen, Torsten W. Bentzen, Adele K. Reinking, Glen E. Liston, Kelly Elder, Elizabeth A. Lenart, Alexander K. Prichard and Jeffrey M. Welker

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:48

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  18. Different theories suggest birds may use compass or map navigational systems associated with Earth’s magnetic intensity or inclination, especially during migratory flights. These theories have only been tested...

    Authors: Beate Zein, Jed A. Long, Kamran Safi, Andrea Kölzsch, Martin Wikelski, Helmut Kruckenberg and Urška Demšar

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:46

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  19. Conservation and management of migratory animals has gained attention in recent years, but the majority of research has focused on stereotypical ‘migrant’ and ‘resident’ behaviors, often failing to incorporate...

    Authors: Madelon van de Kerk, Randy T. Larsen, Daniel D. Olson, Kent R. Hersey and Brock R. McMillan

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:44

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  20. Diving marine predators forage in a three-dimensional environment, adjusting their horizontal and vertical movement behaviour in response to environmental conditions and the spatial distribution of prey. Expec...

    Authors: Javed Riaz, Sophie Bestley, Simon Wotherspoon and Louise Emmerson

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:43

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  21. Parental care benefits the offspring, but comes at a cost for each parent, which in biparental species gives rise to a conflict between partners regarding the within-pair distribution of care. Pair members cou...

    Authors: Marwa M. Kavelaars, Jan M. Baert, Jolien Van Malderen, Eric W. M. Stienen, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Luc Lens and Wendt Müller

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:42

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  22. Movement ecology is increasingly relying on experimental approaches and hypothesis testing to reveal how, when, where, why, and which animals move. Movement of megafauna is inherently interesting but many of t...

    Authors: Robert J. Lennox, Samuel Westrelin, Allan T. Souza, Marek Šmejkal, Milan Říha, Marie Prchalová, Ran Nathan, Barbara Koeck, Shaun Killen, Ivan Jarić, Karl Gjelland, Jack Hollins, Gustav Hellstrom, Henry Hansen, Steven J. Cooke, David Boukal…

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:40

    Content type: Review

    Published on:

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:52

  23. Route choice and travel performance of fly-forage migrants are partly driven by large-scale habitat availability, but it remains unclear to what extent wind support through large-scale wind regimes moulds thei...

    Authors: Wouter M.G. Vansteelant, Laura Gangoso, Willem Bouten, Duarte S. Viana and Jordi Figuerola

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:37

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  24. A challenge faced by animals living in groups with stable long-term membership is to effectively coordinate their actions and maintain cohesion. However, as seasonal conditions alter the distribution of resour...

    Authors: Danai Papageorgiou, David Rozen-Rechels, Brendah Nyaguthii and Damien R. Farine

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:38

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  25. There is growing evidence that individuals within populations can vary in both habitat use and movement behavior, but it is still not clear how these two relate to each other. The aim of this study was to test...

    Authors: Patricia Kerches-Rogeri, Danielle Leal Ramos, Jukka Siren, Beatriz de Oliveira Teles, Rafael Souza Cruz Alves, Camila Fátima Priante, Milton Cezar Ribeiro, Márcio Silva Araújo and Otso Ovaskainen

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:35

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  26. Reintroducing predators is a promising conservation tool to help remedy human-caused ecosystem changes. However, the growth and spread of a reintroduced population is a spatiotemporal process that is driven by...

    Authors: Joseph M. Eisaguirre, Perry J. Williams, Xinyi Lu, Michelle L. Kissling, William S. Beatty, George G. Esslinger, Jamie N. Womble and Mevin B. Hooten

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:34

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  27. When assessing connectivity, it is crucial to rely on accurate modeling frameworks that consider species movement preferences and patterns. One important aspect is the level of randomness or unpredictability i...

    Authors: Teresa Goicolea, Aitor Gastón, Pablo Cisneros-Araujo, Juan Ignacio García-Viñas and M. Cruz Mateo-Sánchez

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:33

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  28. In-flight conditions are hypothesized to influence the timing and success of long-distance migration. Wind assistance and thermal uplift are thought to reduce the energetic costs of flight, humidity, air press...

    Authors: Batbayar Galtbalt, Amanda Lilleyman, Jonathan T. Coleman, Chuyu Cheng, Zhijun Ma, Danny I. Rogers, Bradley K. Woodworth, Richard A. Fuller, Stephen T. Garnett and Marcel Klaassen

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:32

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:51

  29. Migratory animals use information from the Earth’s magnetic field on their journeys. Geomagnetic navigation has been observed across many taxa, but how animals use geomagnetic information to find their way is ...

    Authors: Fernando Benitez-Paez, Vanessa da Silva Brum-Bastos, Ciarán D. Beggan, Jed A. Long and Urška Demšar

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:31

    Content type: Methodology article

    Published on:

  30. Identifying the behavioral state for wild animals that can’t be directly observed is of growing interest to the ecological community. Advances in telemetry technology and statistical methodologies allow resear...

    Authors: Frances E. Buderman, Tess M. Gingery, Duane R. Diefenbach, Laura C. Gigliotti, Danielle Begley-Miller, Marc M. McDill, Bret D. Wallingford, Christopher S. Rosenberry and Patrick J. Drohan

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:30

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  31. Animal-attached devices can be used on cryptic species to measure their movement and behaviour, enabling unprecedented insights into fundamental aspects of animal ecology and behaviour. However, direct observa...

    Authors: Eleanor R. Dickinson, Joshua P. Twining, Rory Wilson, Philip A. Stephens, Jennie Westander, Nikki Marks and David M. Scantlebury

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:28

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  32. Social interactions, reproductive demands and intrinsic constraints all influence foraging decisions in animals. Understanding the relative importance of these factors in shaping the way that coexisting specie...

    Authors: R. E. Austin, F. De Pascalis, S. C. Votier, J. Haakonsson, J. P. Y. Arnould, G. Ebanks-Petrie, J. Newton, J. Harvey and J. A. Green

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:27

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  33. Tri-axial accelerometers have been used to remotely describe and identify in situ behaviours of a range of animals without requiring direct observations. Datasets collected from these accelerometers (i.e. acce...

    Authors: Thomas M. Clarke, Sasha K. Whitmarsh, Jenna L. Hounslow, Adrian C. Gleiss, Nicholas L. Payne and Charlie Huveneers

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:26

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  34. Species interactions may affect spatial dynamics when the movement of one species is determined by the presence of another one. The most direct species-dependence of dispersal is vectored, usually cross-kingdo...

    Authors: T. Parmentier, R. Claus, F. De Laender and D. Bonte

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:25

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  35. Energy landscapes provide an approach to the mechanistic basis of spatial ecology and decision-making in animals. This is based on the quantification of the variation in the energy costs of movements through a...

    Authors: Juan F. Masello, Andres Barbosa, Akiko Kato, Thomas Mattern, Renata Medeiros, Jennifer E. Stockdale, Marc N. Kümmel, Paco Bustamante, Josabel Belliure, Jesús Benzal, Roger Colominas-Ciuró, Javier Menéndez-Blázquez, Sven Griep, Alexander Goesmann, William O. C. Symondson and Petra Quillfeldt

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:24

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  36. Migratory connectivity links the different populations across the full cycle and across the species range and may lead to differences in survival among populations. Studies on spatial and temporal migratory co...

    Authors: Camille Bégin-Marchand, André Desrochers, Philip D. Taylor, Junior A. Tremblay, Lucas Berrigan, Barbara Frei, Ana Morales and Greg W. Mitchell

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:23

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  37. According to central place foraging theory, animals will only increase the distance of their foraging trips if more distant prey patches offer better foraging opportunities. Thus, theory predicts that breeding...

    Authors: Jessica Ann Phillips, Annette L. Fayet, Tim Guilford, Fabrizio Manco, Victoria Warwick-Evans and Phil Trathan

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:22

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  38. The migration patterns of land birds can generally be divided into those species that migrate principally during the day and those that migrate during the night. Some species may show individual plasticity in ...

    Authors: Christie D. Lavallée, Saeedeh Bani Assadi, Alicia M. Korpach, James D. Ray, Jason D. Fischer, Joe Siegrist and Kevin C. Fraser

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:21

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  39. New wildlife telemetry and tracking technologies have become available in the last decade, leading to a large increase in the volume and resolution of animal tracking data. These technical developments have be...

    Authors: Moritz Mercker, Philipp Schwemmer, Verena Peschko, Leonie Enners and Stefan Garthe

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:20

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:29

  40. An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

    Authors: Dalton J. Hance, Katie M. Moriarty, Bruce A. Hollen and Russell W. Perry

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:19

    Content type: Correction

    Published on:

    The original article was published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:17

  41. The intensification of agricultural practices over the twentieth century led to a cascade of detrimental effects on ecosystems. In Europe, agri-environment schemes (AES) have since been adopted to counter the ...

    Authors: Robin Séchaud, Kim Schalcher, Ana Paula Machado, Bettina Almasi, Carolina Massa, Kamran Safi and Alexandre Roulin

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:18

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  42. Studies of animal movement using location data are often faced with two challenges. First, time series of animal locations are likely to arise from multiple behavioral states (e.g., directed movement, resting)...

    Authors: Dalton J. Hance, Katie M. Moriarty, Bruce A. Hollen and Russell W. Perry

    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:17

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:19