Skip to main content

Articles

Page 1 of 10

  1. Fidelity to a given foraging location or route may be beneficial when environmental conditions are predictable but costly if conditions deteriorate or become unpredictable. Understanding the magnitude of fidel...

    Authors: Charlotte E. Regan, Maria I. Bogdanova, Mark Newell, Carrie Gunn, Sarah Wanless, Mike P. Harris, Samuel Langlois Lopez, Ella Benninghaus, Mark Bolton, Francis Daunt and Kate R. Searle
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:46
  2. The movements and behaviour of mature European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) in UK waters have not been studied extensively since a series of mark-recapture experiments during the 1970s, 80s and 90s. To bett...

    Authors: Serena Wright, Christopher A. Griffiths, Victoria Bendall, David Righton, Kieran Hyder and Ewan Hunter
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:45
  3. The application of supervised machine learning methods to identify behavioural modes from inertial measurements of bio-loggers has become a standard tool in behavioural ecology. Several design choices can affe...

    Authors: Yehezkel S. Resheff, Hanna M. Bensch, Markus Zöttl, Roi Harel, Akiko Matsumoto-Oda, Margaret C. Crofoot, Sara Gomez, Luca Börger and Shay Rotics
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:44
  4. Accurate predictions of animal occurrence in time and space are crucial for informing and implementing science-based management strategies for threatened species.

    Authors: Luciana C. Ferreira, Curt Jenner, Micheline Jenner, Vinay Udyawer, Ben Radford, Andrew Davenport, Luciana Moller, Virginia Andrews-Goff, Mike Double and Michele Thums
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:42
  5. Migrating birds fly non-stop for hours or even for days. They rely mainly on fat as fuel complemented by a certain amount of protein. Studies on homing pigeons and birds flying in a wind-tunnel suggest that th...

    Authors: Susanne Jenni-Eiermann, Felix Liechti, Martins Briedis, Yann Rime and Lukas Jenni
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:41
  6. Individual variation in movement strategies of foraging loggerhead turtles have been documented on the scale of tens to hundreds of kilometers within single ocean basins. Use of different strategies among indi...

    Authors: Margaret M. Lamont, Daniel Slone, James P. Reid, Susan M. Butler and Joseph Alday
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:40
  7. External tags, such as transmitters and loggers, are often used to study bat movements. However, physiological and behavioural effects on bats carrying tags have rarely been investigated, and recommendations o...

    Authors: Marit Kelling, Shannon E. Currie, Sara A. Troxell, Christine Reusch, Manuel Roeleke, Uwe Hoffmeister, Tobias Teige and Christian C. Voigt
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:38
  8. The life cycle of most baleen whales involves annual migrations from low-latitude breeding grounds to high latitude feeding grounds. In most species, these migrations are traditionally considered to be carried...

    Authors: Raquel García-Vernet, Diego Rita, Martine Bérubé, Julia Elgueta-Serra, Marina Pascual Guasch, Gísli Víkingsson, Marc Ruiz-Sagalés, Asunción Borrell and Alex Aguilar
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:36
  9. The meagre, Argyrosomus regius, is a large coastal predatory fish inhabiting waters from the north-eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea, where it is targeted by commercial and recreational fisheries. Previous g...

    Authors: Miguel Gandra, Alexander C. Winkler, Pedro Afonso and David Abecasis
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:35
  10. While interactions in nature are inherently local, ecological models often assume homogeneity across space, allowing for generalization across systems and greater mathematical tractability. Density-dependent d...

    Authors: Brendan D. Carson, Colin M. Orians and Elizabeth E. Crone
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:34
  11. Prey are more vulnerable during migration due to decreased familiarity with their surroundings and spatially concentrated movements. Predators may respond to increased prey vulnerability by shifting their rang...

    Authors: Nathaniel H. Wehr, Seth A. Moore, Edmund J. Isaac, Kenneth F. Kellner, Joshua J. Millspaugh and Jerrold L. Belant
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:33
  12. The wild pig (Sus scrofa) is an exotic species that has been present in the southeastern United States for centuries yet continues to expand into new areas dominated by bottomland and upland forests, the latter o...

    Authors: Tyler S. Evans, Natasha Ellison, Melanie R. Boudreau, Bronson K. Strickland, Garrett M. Street and Raymond B. Iglay
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:32
  13. Acoustic telemetry has become a fundamental tool to monitor the movement of aquatic species. Advances in technology, in particular the development of batteries with lives of > 10 years, have increased our abil...

    Authors: Adam Barnett, Fabrice R. A. Jaine, Stacy L. Bierwagen, Nicolas Lubitz, Kátya Abrantes, Michelle R. Heupel, Rob Harcourt, Charlie Huveneers, Ross G. Dwyer, Vinay Udyawer, Colin A. Simpfendorfer, Ingo B. Miller, Tracey Scott-Holland, Carley S. Kilpatrick, Samuel M Williams, Daniel Smith…
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:31
  14. Glucocorticoids are often associated with stressful environments, but they are also thought to drive the best strategies to improve fitness in stressful environments. Glucocorticoids improve fitness in part by...

    Authors: Levi Newediuk, Gabriela F. Mastromonaco and Eric Vander Wal
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:30
  15. As a globally widespread apex predator, humans have unprecedented lethal and non-lethal effects on prey populations and ecosystems. Yet compared to non-human predators, little is known about the movement ecolo...

    Authors: Kaitlyn M. Gaynor, Alex McInturff, Briana L. Abrahms, Alison M. Smith and Justin S. Brashares
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:29
  16. Trailing-edge populations at the low-latitude, receding edge of a shifting range face high extinction risk from climate change unless they are able to track optimal environmental conditions through dispersal.

    Authors: Heather E. Gaya, Robert J. Cooper, Clayton D. Delancey, Jeffrey Hepinstall-Cymerman, Elizabeth A. Kurimo-Beechuk, William B. Lewis, Samuel A. Merker and Richard B. Chandler
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:28
  17. Ecological segregation allows populations to reduce competition and coexist in sympatry. Using as model organisms two closely related gadfly petrels endemic to the Madeira archipelago and breeding with a two m...

    Authors: Francesco Ventura, José Pedro Granadeiro, Paulo Catry, Carina Gjerdrum, Federico De Pascalis, Filipe Viveiros, Isamberto Silva, Dilia Menezes, Vítor H Paiva and Mónica C Silva
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:27
  18. Modern agriculture has undoubtedly led to increasing wildlife-human conflicts, notably concerning bird damage in productive and attractive crops during some parts of the annual cycle. This issue requires utmos...

    Authors: Rémi Chambon, Jean-Marc Paillisson, Jérôme Fournier-Sowinski and Sébastien Dugravot
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:26
  19. Optimal management of voluntary energy expenditure is crucial to the survival and reproductive success of wild animals. Nevertheless, a growing appreciation of inter-individual variation in the internal state ...

    Authors: Julius G. Bright Ross, Andrew Markham, Christina D. Buesching, Catherine Hambly, John R. Speakman, David W. Macdonald and Chris Newman
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:24
  20. Migratory birds generally have tightly scheduled annual cycles, in which delays can have carry-over effects on the timing of later events, ultimately impacting reproductive output. Whether temporal carry-over ...

    Authors: Rob S. A. van Bemmelen, Børge Moe, Hans Schekkerman, Sveinn Are Hansen, Katherine R. S. Snell, Elizabeth M. Humphreys, Elina Mäntylä, Gunnar Thor Hallgrimsson, Olivier Gilg, Dorothée Ehrich, John Calladine, Sjúrður Hammer, Sarah Harris, Johannes Lang, Sölvi Rúnar Vignisson, Yann Kolbeinsson…
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:22
  21. Ecological and physical conditions vary with depth in aquatic ecosystems, resulting in gradients of habitat suitability. Although variation in vertical distributions among individuals provides evidence of habi...

    Authors: Cameron Freshwater, Sean C. Anderson, David D. Huff, Joseph M. Smith, Doug Jackson, Brian Hendriks, Scott G. Hinch, Stephen Johnston, Andrew W. Trites and Jackie King
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:21
  22. Understanding how to connect habitat remnants to facilitate the movement of species is a critical task in an increasingly fragmented world impacted by human activities. The identification of dispersal routes a...

    Authors: Denis Valle, Nina Attias, Joshua A. Cullen, Mevin B. Hooten, Aline Giroux, Luiz Gustavo R. Oliveira-Santos, Arnaud L. J. Desbiez and Robert J. Fletcher Jr.
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:19
  23. Natal dispersal, the distance between site of birth and site of first breeding, has a fundamental role in population dynamics and species’ responses to environmental changes. Population density is considered a...

    Authors: Ida Penttinen, Carina Nebel, Torsten Stjernberg, Laura Kvist, Suvi Ponnikas and Toni Laaksonen
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:16
  24. Diadromous fish such as the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) are hampered by a high density of barriers in estuaries and freshwater systems. Modified and fragmented waterbodies lack tidal flows, and habitat ma...

    Authors: A. B. Griffioen, T. Wilkes, O. A. van Keeken, T. van der Hammen, A. D. Buijse and H. V. Winter
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:15
  25. Interaction through movement can be used as a marker to understand and model interspecific and intraspecific species dynamics, and the collective behavior of animals sharing the same space. This research lever...

    Authors: Yifei Liu, Somayeh Dodge, Achara Simcharoen, Sean C. Ahearn and James L. D. Smith
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:13
  26. The ice-free season (typically late-June to early-October) is crucial for anadromous species of fish in the Arctic, including Arctic Char (Salvelinus alpinus), which must acquire adequate resources for growth, re...

    Authors: Rosie Smith, Eric Hitkolok, Tracey Loewen, Amanda Dumond and Heidi Swanson
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:12
  27. Understanding drivers of space use by African elephants is critical to their conservation and management, particularly given their large home-ranges, extensive resource requirements, ecological role as ecosyst...

    Authors: Jake Wall, Nathan Hahn, Sarah Carroll, Stephen Mwiu, Marc Goss, Wilson Sairowua, Kate Tiedeman, Sospeter Kiambi, Patrick Omondi, Iain Douglas-Hamilton and George Wittemyer
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:11
  28. Measuring coastal-pelagic prey fields at scales relevant to the movements of marine predators is challenging due to the dynamic and ephemeral nature of these environments. Whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) are thoug...

    Authors: Ben D’Antonio, Luciana C. Ferreira, Mark Meekan, Paul G. Thomson, Lilian Lieber, Patti Virtue, Chloe Power, Charitha B. Pattiaratchi, Andrew S. Brierley, Ana M. M. Sequeira and Michele Thums
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:10
  29. Improved understanding of wildlife population connectivity among protected area networks can support effective planning for the persistence of wildlife populations in the face of land use and climate change. C...

    Authors: Sarah L. Carroll, Greta M. Schmidt, John S. Waller and Tabitha A. Graves
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:8
  30. Information on reproduction of harvested species such as mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is vital for conservation and management. Furthermore, parturition in ungulates may be detected using patterns of movement ...

    Authors: Tabitha A. Hughes, Randy T. Larsen, Kent R. Hersey, Madelon van de Kerk and Brock R. McMillan
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:6
  31. Efficient movement and energy expenditure are vital for animal survival. Human disturbance can alter animal movement due to changes in resource availability and threats. Some animals can exploit anthropogenic ...

    Authors: M. A. Cowan, J. A. Dunlop, L. A. Gibson, H. A. Moore, S. A. Setterfield and D. G. Nimmo
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:5
  32. Central place foragers must acquire resources and return to a central location after foraging bouts. During the egg laying (hereafter laying) period, females are constrained to a nest location, thus they must ...

    Authors: Nicholas W. Bakner, Erin E. Ulrey, Bret A. Collier and Michael J. Chamberlain
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:4
  33. Alterations in weather patterns due to climate change are accelerated in alpine environments, but mountains also provide a wide range of niches and potential refuge areas. In order to identify future critical ...

    Authors: Pia Anderwald, Sven Buchmann, Thomas Rempfler and Flurin Filli
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:3
  34. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are often used to model multi-state capture-recapture data in ecology. However, a variety of HMM modeling approaches and software exist, including both maximum likelihood and Bayesi...

    Authors: Charles J. Labuzzetta, Alison A. Coulter and Richard A. Erickson
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:2
  35. Animals of many different species, trophic levels, and life history strategies migrate, and the improvement of animal tracking technology allows ecologists to collect increasing amounts of detailed data on the...

    Authors: Peter R. Thompson, Peter D. Harrington, Conor D. Mallory, Subhash R. Lele, Erin M. Bayne, Andrew E. Derocher, Mark A. Edwards, Mitch Campbell and Mark A. Lewis
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:1
  36. Site fidelity, the tendency to return to a previously visited site, is commonly observed in migratory birds. This behaviour would be advantageous if birds returning to the same site, benefit from their previou...

    Authors: Ying-Chi Chan, David Tsz Chung Chan, T. Lee Tibbitts, Chris J. Hassell and Theunis Piersma
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:79
  37. Across the animal kingdom, from honeybees to cranes to beavers, exploratory movements to exploit resources, scout prospective territories, or otherwise gain valuable experiences and information that promote fi...

    Authors: Zephyr Züst, Andrey Mukhin, Philip D. Taylor and Heiko Schmaljohann
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:78
  38. Animal movement is increasingly affected by human alterations to habitat and climate change. In wetland systems, widespread hydrologic alterations from agriculture have changed the shape, function, and stabili...

    Authors: Benjamin J. Zdasiuk, Marie-Josée Fortin, Julia E. Colm, D. Andrew R. Drake and Nicholas E. Mandrak
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:77
  39. For soaring birds, the ability to benefit from variable airflow dynamics is crucial, especially while crossing natural barriers such as vast water bodies during migration. Soaring birds also take advantage of ...

    Authors: J. Škrábal, Š. Krejčí, R. Raab, E. Sebastián-González and I. Literák
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:76