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  1. Natal dispersal, the distance between site of birth and site of first breeding, has a fundamental role in population dynamics and species’ responses to environmental changes. Population density is considered a...

    Authors: Ida Penttinen, Carina Nebel, Torsten Stjernberg, Laura Kvist, Suvi Ponnikas and Toni Laaksonen
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:16
  2. Diadromous fish such as the European eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) are hampered by a high density of barriers in estuaries and freshwater systems. Modified and fragmented waterbodies lack tidal flows, and habitat ma...

    Authors: A. B. Griffioen, T. Wilkes, O. A. van Keeken, T. van der Hammen, A. D. Buijse and H. V. Winter
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:15
  3. Interaction through movement can be used as a marker to understand and model interspecific and intraspecific species dynamics, and the collective behavior of animals sharing the same space. This research lever...

    Authors: Yifei Liu, Somayeh Dodge, Achara Simcharoen, Sean C. Ahearn and James L. D. Smith
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:13
  4. The ice-free season (typically late-June to early-October) is crucial for anadromous species of fish in the Arctic, including Arctic Char (Salvelinus alpinus), which must acquire adequate resources for growth, re...

    Authors: Rosie Smith, Eric Hitkolok, Tracey Loewen, Amanda Dumond and Heidi Swanson
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:12
  5. Understanding drivers of space use by African elephants is critical to their conservation and management, particularly given their large home-ranges, extensive resource requirements, ecological role as ecosyst...

    Authors: Jake Wall, Nathan Hahn, Sarah Carroll, Stephen Mwiu, Marc Goss, Wilson Sairowua, Kate Tiedeman, Sospeter Kiambi, Patrick Omondi, Iain Douglas-Hamilton and George Wittemyer
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:11
  6. Measuring coastal-pelagic prey fields at scales relevant to the movements of marine predators is challenging due to the dynamic and ephemeral nature of these environments. Whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) are thoug...

    Authors: Ben D’Antonio, Luciana C. Ferreira, Mark Meekan, Paul G. Thomson, Lilian Lieber, Patti Virtue, Chloe Power, Charitha B. Pattiaratchi, Andrew S. Brierley, Ana M. M. Sequeira and Michele Thums
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:10
  7. Improved understanding of wildlife population connectivity among protected area networks can support effective planning for the persistence of wildlife populations in the face of land use and climate change. C...

    Authors: Sarah L. Carroll, Greta M. Schmidt, John S. Waller and Tabitha A. Graves
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:8
  8. Information on reproduction of harvested species such as mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) is vital for conservation and management. Furthermore, parturition in ungulates may be detected using patterns of movement ...

    Authors: Tabitha A. Hughes, Randy T. Larsen, Kent R. Hersey, Madelon van de Kerk and Brock R. McMillan
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:6
  9. Efficient movement and energy expenditure are vital for animal survival. Human disturbance can alter animal movement due to changes in resource availability and threats. Some animals can exploit anthropogenic ...

    Authors: M. A. Cowan, J. A. Dunlop, L. A. Gibson, H. A. Moore, S. A. Setterfield and D. G. Nimmo
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:5
  10. Central place foragers must acquire resources and return to a central location after foraging bouts. During the egg laying (hereafter laying) period, females are constrained to a nest location, thus they must ...

    Authors: Nicholas W. Bakner, Erin E. Ulrey, Bret A. Collier and Michael J. Chamberlain
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:4
  11. Alterations in weather patterns due to climate change are accelerated in alpine environments, but mountains also provide a wide range of niches and potential refuge areas. In order to identify future critical ...

    Authors: Pia Anderwald, Sven Buchmann, Thomas Rempfler and Flurin Filli
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:3
  12. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are often used to model multi-state capture-recapture data in ecology. However, a variety of HMM modeling approaches and software exist, including both maximum likelihood and Bayesi...

    Authors: Charles J. Labuzzetta, Alison A. Coulter and Richard A. Erickson
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:2
  13. Animals of many different species, trophic levels, and life history strategies migrate, and the improvement of animal tracking technology allows ecologists to collect increasing amounts of detailed data on the...

    Authors: Peter R. Thompson, Peter D. Harrington, Conor D. Mallory, Subhash R. Lele, Erin M. Bayne, Andrew E. Derocher, Mark A. Edwards, Mitch Campbell and Mark A. Lewis
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2024 12:1
  14. Site fidelity, the tendency to return to a previously visited site, is commonly observed in migratory birds. This behaviour would be advantageous if birds returning to the same site, benefit from their previou...

    Authors: Ying-Chi Chan, David Tsz Chung Chan, T. Lee Tibbitts, Chris J. Hassell and Theunis Piersma
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:79
  15. Across the animal kingdom, from honeybees to cranes to beavers, exploratory movements to exploit resources, scout prospective territories, or otherwise gain valuable experiences and information that promote fi...

    Authors: Zephyr Züst, Andrey Mukhin, Philip D. Taylor and Heiko Schmaljohann
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:78
  16. Animal movement is increasingly affected by human alterations to habitat and climate change. In wetland systems, widespread hydrologic alterations from agriculture have changed the shape, function, and stabili...

    Authors: Benjamin J. Zdasiuk, Marie-Josée Fortin, Julia E. Colm, D. Andrew R. Drake and Nicholas E. Mandrak
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:77
  17. For soaring birds, the ability to benefit from variable airflow dynamics is crucial, especially while crossing natural barriers such as vast water bodies during migration. Soaring birds also take advantage of ...

    Authors: J. Škrábal, Š. Krejčí, R. Raab, E. Sebastián-González and I. Literák
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:76
  18. Seasonal changes in resource availability are known to influence the migratory behaviour of animals, including both timing and distance. While the influence of environmental cues on migratory behaviour has bee...

    Authors: Rita F. Ramos, Aldina M.A. Franco, James J. Gilroy and João P. Silva
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:75
  19. Contact among animals is crucial for various ecological processes, including social behaviors, disease transmission, and predator–prey interactions. However, the distribution of contact events across time and ...

    Authors: Anni Yang, Raoul Boughton, Ryan S. Miller, Nathan P. Snow, Kurt C. Vercauteren, Kim M. Pepin and George Wittemyer
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:74
  20. A long dispersal distance is widely used to indicate high invasiveness, but it ignores the temporal dimensions of plant invasion. Faster dispersal rates (= distance/time) of invasive species than native ones h...

    Authors: Bo Zhang, Alan Hastings, Edwin D. Grosholz and Lu Zhai
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:73
  21. Kangaroo rats are small mammals that are among the most abundant vertebrates in many terrestrial ecosystems in Western North America and are considered both keystone species and ecosystem engineers, providing ...

    Authors: Ryan J. Hanscom, Jessica L. Hill, Charlotte Patterson, Tyler Marbach, Jeet Sukumaran, Timothy E. Higham and Rulon W. Clark
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:72
  22. Understanding the processes that determine how animals allocate time to space is a major challenge, although it is acknowledged that summed animal movement pathways over time must define space-time use. The cr...

    Authors: Richard M. Gunner, Rory P. Wilson, Mark D. Holton, Nigel C. Bennett, Abdulaziz N. Alagaili, Mads F. Bertelsen, Osama B. Mohammed, Tobias Wang, Paul R. Manger, Khairi Ismael and D. Michael Scantlebury
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:71
  23. Group living animals, such as shorebirds foraging on intertidal mudflats, may use social information about where to find hidden food items. However, flocking also increases intraspecific competition for resour...

    Authors: He-Bo Peng, Chi-Yeung Choi, Zhijun Ma, Allert I. Bijleveld, David S. Melville and Theunis Piersma
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:70
  24. Animal movement is a multifaceted process that occurs for multiple reasons with powerful consequences for food web and ecosystem dynamics. New paradigms and technical innovations have recently pervaded the fie...

    Authors: Christer Brönmark, Gustav Hellström, Henrik Baktoft, Lars-Anders Hansson, Erin S. McCallum, P. Anders Nilsson, Christian Skov, Tomas Brodin and Kaj Hulthén
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:68
  25. The risk posed by offshore wind farms to seabirds through collisions with turbine blades is greatly influenced by species-specific flight behaviour. Bird-borne telemetry devices may provide improved measuremen...

    Authors: Daniel T. Johnston, Chris B. Thaxter, Philipp H. Boersch-Supan, Jacob G. Davies, Gary D. Clewley, Ros M. W. Green, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Aonghais S. C. P. Cook, Niall H. K. Burton and Elizabeth M. Humphreys
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:66
  26. Animal behavior can be difficult, time-consuming, and costly to observe in the field directly. Innovative modeling methods, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs), allow researchers to infer unobserved animal beh...

    Authors: Kathleen P. Gundermann, D. R. Diefenbach, W. D. Walter, A. M. Corondi, J. E. Banfield, B. D. Wallingford, D. P. Stainbrook, C. S. Rosenberry and F. E. Buderman
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:65
  27. The movement of individual weaver ants, of Oecophylla smaragdina, was previously tracked within an unfamiliar arena. We develop an empirical model, based on Brownian motion with a linear drag and constant driving...

    Authors: L. Charoonratana, T. Thiwatwaranikul, P. Paisanpan, S. Suksombat and M. F. Smith
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:64

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2024 12:18

  28. Many Norwegian rivers and lakes are regulated for hydropower, which affects freshwater ecosystems and anadromous fish species, such as sea trout (Salmo trutta). Lakes are an important feature of many anadromous r...

    Authors: Lotte S. Dahlmo, Gaute Velle, Cecilie I. Nilsen, Ulrich Pulg, Robert J. Lennox and Knut W. Vollset
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:63
  29. Animal movement is a behavioral trait shaped by the need to find food and suitable habitat, avoid predators, and reproduce. Using high-resolution tracking data, it is possible to describe movement in greater d...

    Authors: Roland Kays, Ben Hirsch, Damien Caillaud, Rafael Mares, Shauhin Alavi, Rasmus Worsøe Havmøller and Margaret Crofoot
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:61
  30. It is a long-standing view that the main mechanism maintaining narrow migratory divides in passerines is the selection against intermediate and suboptimal migratory direction, but empirical proof of this is st...

    Authors: Kristaps Sokolovskis, Violeta Caballero-Lopez, Susanne Åkesson, Max Lundberg, Mikkel Willemoes, Tianhao Zhao and Staffan Bensch
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:58
  31. Fisheries managers stock triploid (i.e., infertile, artificially produced) rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in North American lakes to support sport fisheries while minimizing the risk of genetic introgression b...

    Authors: Jessica E. Pease, James P. Losee, Stephen Caromile, Gabriel Madel, Michael Lucero, Anna Kagley, Michael G. Bertram, Jake M. Martin, Thomas P. Quinn, Daniel Palm and Gustav Hellström
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:57
  32. Long-distance migratory birds spend most of their annual cycle in non-breeding areas. During this period birds must meet their daily nutritional needs and acquire additional energy intake to deal with future e...

    Authors: Enzo Basso, Johannes Horstmann, Eldar Rakhimberdiev, José M. Abad-Gómez, José A. Masero, Jorge S. Gutiérrez, Jorge Valenzuela, Jorge Ruiz and Juan G. Navedo
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:55
  33. In lake ecosystems, predatory fish can move and forage across both nearshore and offshore habitats. This coupling of sub-habitats, which is important in stabilizing lake food webs, has largely been assessed fr...

    Authors: Paul J. Blanchfield, Graydon McKee, Matthew M. Guzzo, Andrew J. Chapelsky and Peter A. Cott
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:54
  34. Migration enables organisms to access resources in separate regions that have predictable but asynchronous spatiotemporal variability in habitat quality. The classical migration syndrome is defined by key trai...

    Authors: Luke Storrie, Lisa L. Loseto, Emma L. Sutherland, Shannon A. MacPhee, Greg O’Corry-Crowe and Nigel E. Hussey
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:53
  35. Migratory insects are important for the provision of ecosystem services both at the origin and destination sites but – apart from some iconic species – the migration routes of many insect species have not been...

    Authors: Yvonne Oelmann, Diana Fiedler, Rune Michaelis, Meelis Leivits, Andreas Braun, Philipp Gschwind, Harald Neidhardt and Christoph Willigalla
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:52
  36. Understanding which intrinsic and extrinsic factors dictate decision-making processes such as leaving the natal area or not (migratory vs resident strategy), departure time, and non-breeding destination are ke...

    Authors: Davide Scridel, Simone Pirrello, Simona Imperio, Jacopo G. Cecere, Giuseppe Albanese, Alessandro Andreotti, Giovanni Arveda, Fabrizio Borghesi, Giuseppe La Gioia, Luisanna Massa, Chiara Mengoni, Pierfrancesco Micheloni, Nadia Mucci, Riccardo Nardelli, Sergio Nissardi, Stefano Volponi…
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:51
  37. Fish migration has severely been impacted by dam construction. Through the disruption of fish migration routes, freshwater fish communities have seen an incredible decline. Fishways, which have been constructe...

    Authors: J. Elings, R. Mawer, S. Bruneel, I. S. Pauwels, E. Pickholtz, R. Pickholtz, J. Coeck, M. Schneider and P. Goethals
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:50
  38. Migration is a vital element of the life cycle of many freshwater fish species but is increasingly hampered globally by riverine barriers. Fish passes are a common approach to enable migration past barriers bu...

    Authors: Rachel Mawer, Stijn P. Bruneel, Ine S. Pauwels, Jelger Elings, Eliezer Pickholtz, Renanel Pickholtz, Matthias Schneider, Johan Coeck and Peter L. M. Goethals
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:49
  39. The study of the timing of migration is fundamental to the understanding of the ecology of many bird species and their response to climate change, and it has important conservation and management implications ...

    Authors: Roberto Ambrosini, Simona Imperio, Jacopo G. Cecere, Alessandro Andreotti, Lorenzo Serra, Fernando Spina, Niccolò Fattorini and Alessandra Costanzo
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2023 11:47