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  1. Different theories suggest birds may use compass or map navigational systems associated with Earth’s magnetic intensity or inclination, especially during migratory flights. These theories have only been tested...

    Authors: Beate Zein, Jed A. Long, Kamran Safi, Andrea Kölzsch, Martin Wikelski, Helmut Kruckenberg and Urška Demšar
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:46
  2. Conservation and management of migratory animals has gained attention in recent years, but the majority of research has focused on stereotypical ‘migrant’ and ‘resident’ behaviors, often failing to incorporate...

    Authors: Madelon van de Kerk, Randy T. Larsen, Daniel D. Olson, Kent R. Hersey and Brock R. McMillan
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:44
  3. Diving marine predators forage in a three-dimensional environment, adjusting their horizontal and vertical movement behaviour in response to environmental conditions and the spatial distribution of prey. Expec...

    Authors: Javed Riaz, Sophie Bestley, Simon Wotherspoon and Louise Emmerson
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:43
  4. Parental care benefits the offspring, but comes at a cost for each parent, which in biparental species gives rise to a conflict between partners regarding the within-pair distribution of care. Pair members cou...

    Authors: Marwa M. Kavelaars, Jan M. Baert, Jolien Van Malderen, Eric W. M. Stienen, Judy Shamoun-Baranes, Luc Lens and Wendt Müller
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:42
  5. Movement ecology is increasingly relying on experimental approaches and hypothesis testing to reveal how, when, where, why, and which animals move. Movement of megafauna is inherently interesting but many of t...

    Authors: Robert J. Lennox, Samuel Westrelin, Allan T. Souza, Marek Šmejkal, Milan Říha, Marie Prchalová, Ran Nathan, Barbara Koeck, Shaun Killen, Ivan Jarić, Karl Gjelland, Jack Hollins, Gustav Hellstrom, Henry Hansen, Steven J. Cooke, David Boukal…
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:40

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:52

  6. Route choice and travel performance of fly-forage migrants are partly driven by large-scale habitat availability, but it remains unclear to what extent wind support through large-scale wind regimes moulds thei...

    Authors: Wouter M.G. Vansteelant, Laura Gangoso, Willem Bouten, Duarte S. Viana and Jordi Figuerola
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:37
  7. A challenge faced by animals living in groups with stable long-term membership is to effectively coordinate their actions and maintain cohesion. However, as seasonal conditions alter the distribution of resour...

    Authors: Danai Papageorgiou, David Rozen-Rechels, Brendah Nyaguthii and Damien R. Farine
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:38
  8. There is growing evidence that individuals within populations can vary in both habitat use and movement behavior, but it is still not clear how these two relate to each other. The aim of this study was to test...

    Authors: Patricia Kerches-Rogeri, Danielle Leal Ramos, Jukka Siren, Beatriz de Oliveira Teles, Rafael Souza Cruz Alves, Camila Fátima Priante, Milton Cezar Ribeiro, Márcio Silva Araújo and Otso Ovaskainen
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:35
  9. Reintroducing predators is a promising conservation tool to help remedy human-caused ecosystem changes. However, the growth and spread of a reintroduced population is a spatiotemporal process that is driven by...

    Authors: Joseph M. Eisaguirre, Perry J. Williams, Xinyi Lu, Michelle L. Kissling, William S. Beatty, George G. Esslinger, Jamie N. Womble and Mevin B. Hooten
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:34
  10. When assessing connectivity, it is crucial to rely on accurate modeling frameworks that consider species movement preferences and patterns. One important aspect is the level of randomness or unpredictability i...

    Authors: Teresa Goicolea, Aitor Gastón, Pablo Cisneros-Araujo, Juan Ignacio García-Viñas and M. Cruz Mateo-Sánchez
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:33
  11. In-flight conditions are hypothesized to influence the timing and success of long-distance migration. Wind assistance and thermal uplift are thought to reduce the energetic costs of flight, humidity, air press...

    Authors: Batbayar Galtbalt, Amanda Lilleyman, Jonathan T. Coleman, Chuyu Cheng, Zhijun Ma, Danny I. Rogers, Bradley K. Woodworth, Richard A. Fuller, Stephen T. Garnett and Marcel Klaassen
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:32

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:51

  12. Migratory animals use information from the Earth’s magnetic field on their journeys. Geomagnetic navigation has been observed across many taxa, but how animals use geomagnetic information to find their way is ...

    Authors: Fernando Benitez-Paez, Vanessa da Silva Brum-Bastos, Ciarán D. Beggan, Jed A. Long and Urška Demšar
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:31
  13. Identifying the behavioral state for wild animals that can’t be directly observed is of growing interest to the ecological community. Advances in telemetry technology and statistical methodologies allow resear...

    Authors: Frances E. Buderman, Tess M. Gingery, Duane R. Diefenbach, Laura C. Gigliotti, Danielle Begley-Miller, Marc M. McDill, Bret D. Wallingford, Christopher S. Rosenberry and Patrick J. Drohan
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:30
  14. Animal-attached devices can be used on cryptic species to measure their movement and behaviour, enabling unprecedented insights into fundamental aspects of animal ecology and behaviour. However, direct observa...

    Authors: Eleanor R. Dickinson, Joshua P. Twining, Rory Wilson, Philip A. Stephens, Jennie Westander, Nikki Marks and David M. Scantlebury
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:28
  15. Social interactions, reproductive demands and intrinsic constraints all influence foraging decisions in animals. Understanding the relative importance of these factors in shaping the way that coexisting specie...

    Authors: R. E. Austin, F. De Pascalis, S. C. Votier, J. Haakonsson, J. P. Y. Arnould, G. Ebanks-Petrie, J. Newton, J. Harvey and J. A. Green
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:27
  16. Tri-axial accelerometers have been used to remotely describe and identify in situ behaviours of a range of animals without requiring direct observations. Datasets collected from these accelerometers (i.e. acce...

    Authors: Thomas M. Clarke, Sasha K. Whitmarsh, Jenna L. Hounslow, Adrian C. Gleiss, Nicholas L. Payne and Charlie Huveneers
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:26
  17. Species interactions may affect spatial dynamics when the movement of one species is determined by the presence of another one. The most direct species-dependence of dispersal is vectored, usually cross-kingdo...

    Authors: T. Parmentier, R. Claus, F. De Laender and D. Bonte
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:25
  18. Energy landscapes provide an approach to the mechanistic basis of spatial ecology and decision-making in animals. This is based on the quantification of the variation in the energy costs of movements through a...

    Authors: Juan F. Masello, Andres Barbosa, Akiko Kato, Thomas Mattern, Renata Medeiros, Jennifer E. Stockdale, Marc N. Kümmel, Paco Bustamante, Josabel Belliure, Jesús Benzal, Roger Colominas-Ciuró, Javier Menéndez-Blázquez, Sven Griep, Alexander Goesmann, William O. C. Symondson and Petra Quillfeldt
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:24
  19. Migratory connectivity links the different populations across the full cycle and across the species range and may lead to differences in survival among populations. Studies on spatial and temporal migratory co...

    Authors: Camille Bégin-Marchand, André Desrochers, Philip D. Taylor, Junior A. Tremblay, Lucas Berrigan, Barbara Frei, Ana Morales and Greg W. Mitchell
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:23
  20. According to central place foraging theory, animals will only increase the distance of their foraging trips if more distant prey patches offer better foraging opportunities. Thus, theory predicts that breeding...

    Authors: Jessica Ann Phillips, Annette L. Fayet, Tim Guilford, Fabrizio Manco, Victoria Warwick-Evans and Phil Trathan
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:22

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2022 10:32

  21. The migration patterns of land birds can generally be divided into those species that migrate principally during the day and those that migrate during the night. Some species may show individual plasticity in ...

    Authors: Christie D. Lavallée, Saeedeh Bani Assadi, Alicia M. Korpach, James D. Ray, Jason D. Fischer, Joe Siegrist and Kevin C. Fraser
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:21
  22. New wildlife telemetry and tracking technologies have become available in the last decade, leading to a large increase in the volume and resolution of animal tracking data. These technical developments have be...

    Authors: Moritz Mercker, Philipp Schwemmer, Verena Peschko, Leonie Enners and Stefan Garthe
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:20

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:29

  23. An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via the original article.

    Authors: Dalton J. Hance, Katie M. Moriarty, Bruce A. Hollen and Russell W. Perry
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:19

    The original article was published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:17

  24. The intensification of agricultural practices over the twentieth century led to a cascade of detrimental effects on ecosystems. In Europe, agri-environment schemes (AES) have since been adopted to counter the ...

    Authors: Robin Séchaud, Kim Schalcher, Ana Paula Machado, Bettina Almasi, Carolina Massa, Kamran Safi and Alexandre Roulin
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:18
  25. Studies of animal movement using location data are often faced with two challenges. First, time series of animal locations are likely to arise from multiple behavioral states (e.g., directed movement, resting)...

    Authors: Dalton J. Hance, Katie M. Moriarty, Bruce A. Hollen and Russell W. Perry
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:17

    The Correction to this article has been published in Movement Ecology 2021 9:19

  26. Our understanding of movement patterns and behaviours of wildlife has advanced greatly through the use of improved tracking technologies, including application of accelerometry (ACC) across a wide range of tax...

    Authors: Hui Yu, Jian Deng, Ran Nathan, Max Kröschel, Sasha Pekarsky, Guozheng Li and Marcel Klaassen
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:15
  27. The movement and spatial ecology of an animal depends on its morphological and functional adaptations to its environment. In fossorial animals, adaptations to the underground life help to face peculiar ecologi...

    Authors: José Martín, Jesús Ortega, Roberto García-Roa, Octavio Jiménez-Robles, Gonzalo Rodríguez-Ruiz, Pablo Recio and José Javier Cuervo
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:14
  28. From the laboratory at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, it is common to see the brown pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) traveling along the crests of ocean waves just offshore of the surf-zone. When flying in ...

    Authors: Ian A. Stokes and Andrew J. Lucas
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:13
  29. Movements and habitat selection of predators shape ecological communities by determining the spatiotemporal distribution of predation risk. Although intraspecific interactions associated to territoriality and ...

    Authors: Alexis Grenier-Potvin, Jeanne Clermont, Gilles Gauthier and Dominique Berteaux
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:12
  30. Globally, arid regions are expanding and becoming hotter and drier with climate change. For medium and large bodied endotherms in the arid zone, the necessity to dissipate heat drives a range of adaptations, f...

    Authors: Jack Tatler, Shannon E. Currie, Phillip Cassey, Anne K. Scharf, David A. Roshier and Thomas A. A. Prowse
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:11
  31. For many songbirds in North America, we lack movement details about the full annual cycle, notably outside the breeding season. Understanding how populations are linked spatially between breeding and overwinte...

    Authors: Kristen A. Mancuso, Megan A. Fylling, Christine A. Bishop, Karen E. Hodges, Michael B. Lancaster and Katharine R. Stone
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:10
  32. Departure decisions in long-distance migratory bird species may depend on favourable weather conditions and beneficial resources at the destination location, overarched by genetic triggers. However, few studie...

    Authors: Philipp Schwemmer, Moritz Mercker, Klaus Heinrich Vanselow, Pierrick Bocher and Stefan Garthe
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:9
  33. Over the past two decades, various species of forage fish have been successfully implanted with miniaturized acoustic transmitters and subsequently monitored using stationary acoustic receivers. When acoustic ...

    Authors: Mary A. Bishop and Jordan W. Bernard
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:8
  34. Inertial measurement units (IMUs) with high-resolution sensors such as accelerometers are now used extensively to study fine-scale behavior in a wide range of marine and terrestrial animals. Robust and practic...

    Authors: Melinda G. Conners, Théo Michelot, Eleanor I. Heywood, Rachael A. Orben, Richard A. Phillips, Alexei L. Vyssotski, Scott A. Shaffer and Lesley H. Thorne
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:7
  35. Habitat suitability models give insight into the ecological drivers of species distributions and are increasingly common in management and conservation planning. Telemetry data can be used in habitat models to...

    Authors: Elliott L. Hazen, Briana Abrahms, Stephanie Brodie, Gemma Carroll, Heather Welch and Steven J. Bograd
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:5
  36. Plant dispersal is a critical factor driving ecological responses to global changes. Knowledge on the mechanisms of dispersal is rapidly advancing, but selective pressures responsible for the evolution of disp...

    Authors: Jelle Treep, Monique de Jager, Frederic Bartumeus and Merel B. Soons
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:4
  37. Artificial light at night is recognized as an increasing threat to biodiversity. However, information on the way highly mobile taxa such as bats spatially respond to light is limited. Following the hypothesis ...

    Authors: Kévin Barré, Christian Kerbiriou, Ros-Kiri Ing, Yves Bas, Clémentine Azam, Isabelle Le Viol and Kamiel Spoelstra
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:3
  38. Animal movement patterns are the result of both environmental and physiological effects, and the rates of movement and energy expenditure of given movement strategies are influenced by the physical environment...

    Authors: Jay A. VonBank, Mitch D. Weegman, Paul T. Link, Stephanie A. Cunningham, Kevin J. Kraai, Daniel P. Collins and Bart M. Ballard
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:2
  39. Satellite tags have revolutionized our understanding of marine animal movements. However, tags may stop transmitting for many reasons and little research has rigorously examined tag failure. Using a long-term,...

    Authors: Kristen M. Hart, Jacquelyn C. Guzy and Brian J. Smith
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2021 9:1
  40. Metapopulation persistence in fragmented landscapes is assured by dispersal of individuals between local populations. In this scenario the landscape topography, although usually neglected, may have an importan...

    Authors: Elisa Plazio, Terezie Bubová, Vladimír Vrabec and Piotr Nowicki
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:50
  41. Mobile animals transport nutrients and propagules across habitats, and are crucial for the functioning of food webs and for ecosystem services. Human activities such as urbanization can alter animal movement b...

    Authors: Claire S. Teitelbaum, Jeffrey Hepinstall-Cymerman, Anjelika Kidd-Weaver, Sonia M. Hernandez, Sonia Altizer and Richard J. Hall
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:49
  42. Migratory connectivity describes the degree of linkage between different parts of an animal’s migratory range due to the movement trajectories of individuals. High connectivity occurs when individuals from one...

    Authors: Boya Gao, Johanna Hedlund, Don R. Reynolds, Baoping Zhai, Gao Hu and Jason W. Chapman
    Citation: Movement Ecology 2020 8:48