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Table 1 Overview of the relative availability of habitat types in the study area, the relative availability within the home ranges, and the relative use of those habitat types by roe deer in the Bavarian Forest National Park, in descending order of use

From: Holling meets habitat selection: functional response of large herbivores revisited

Habitat Availability in the study area Availability in the home range Proportional use Cover Biomass (\(\mathrm{gm}^{-3}\))
Old deciduous 0.184 0.230 0.247 0.77 (0.31) 45 (79)
Old mixed 0.231 0.393 0.188 0.73 (0.34) 54 (75)
Old coniferous 0.220 0.188 0.170 0.63 (0.35) 24 (58)
Cultivated meadows 0.051 0.060 0.102 0.16 (0.2) 299 (91)
Medium mixed 0.075 0.045 0.079 0.67 (0.33) 85 (80)
Unmanaged meadows 0.020 0.014 0.064 0.31 (0.26) 349 (41)
Clearcuts 0.046 0.024 0.062 0.25 (0.24) 29 (57)
Young stands 0.020 0.009 0.047 0.36 (0.27) 54(-)
Anthropogenic 0.027 0.022 0.018 0.36 (0.33) 300 (-)
Medium deciduous 0.015 0.007 0.014 0.66 (0.36) 89 (114)
Disturbance area 0.111 0.008 0.010 0.31 (0.24) 10 (53)
  1. The values for cover are the means (and standard deviations) of the fractional cover above 2 m over the study area, as derived from high-resolution airborne laser-scanning (LiDAR, light detection and ranging) in summer. Biomass is the average value of dried biomass within 1 \(m^3\) of a habitat type adapted from [58]